FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions | Hudson Orthodontics

FAQ

Treatment

Frequently Asked Questions

To see the answers below, simply click the text below to expand.

A dentist is similar to your family doctor — great for check-ups and filling cavities. An orthodontist is a specialist who has two to three years of additional education, and is an expert in straightening your teeth and choosing the treatment option that's best for you.  Although it is legal for a dentist to provide Invisalign or braces, people should research the qualifications of their doctor before starting any type of orthodontic treatment to make sure they will receive the outcome they deserve. Learn more from the AAO
Only an board certified orthodontist is able to be a member of the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO).  Many non-orthodontists have started displaying credentials from various companies in their offices such as: Invisalign®, American Orthodontic Society, International Association of Orthodontists, and many others.  If you are ever in doubt, visit http://mylifemysmile.org for reliable information on orthodontics and to verify that your doctor is indeed an actual orthodontist.  After all, Orthodontics, including Invisalign, is a large investment!
If you want to improve the look and feel of your smile, then any age can be a great age to see the orthodontist. The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that children first visit an orthodontist around the age of seven; however, orthodontic treatment is not exclusive to children and teens, with about one in every four orthodontic patients being over the age of 21. Whether you're considering treatment for yourself or for a child, any time is a good time to visit the orthodontist.
The AAO recommends that your child get an orthodontic check-up no later than age 7. By this age, Dr. Hudson can spot problems with jaw growth and emerging teeth while some baby teeth are still present. That’s important, because some orthodontic problems are most easily corrected while the child is still growing. If these problems are found early and treated, we could eliminate the possible need for extractions or surgery in the future. Most orthodontic patients begin active treatment between ages 9 and 14.
No!
While many of our patients are referred by their family dentist, equally as many of our patients take the initiative to schedule an examination or check-up themselves.
Yes. Some orthodontic problems are significant enough to require early intervention. However, if a patient is not yet ready for treatment, we will follow that patient’s growth and development until the time is right for treatment to begin.
Take a look at our “Your First Visit” page to learn all about our free consultation. Upon arriving, each patient and parent will be seen by the staff and doctor who will acclimate you to our office and prepare for the initial exam. We will take the necessary photographs and X-rays to allow us to make a proper diagnosis. The doctor will then complete a brief, but thorough, exam. If you are ready we would be happy to make every effort to get you started right away!
Treatment time obviously depends on each patient’s specific orthodontic needs. In general, treatment time lasts from 6 months to 30 months and varies based on individual treatment complexity, needs, and personal treatment goals.
Orthodontic treatment has come a long way in recent years. New technology allows us to use lighter forces to move the teeth over a much shorter amount of time. You can expect the braces to make your teeth sore for a few days after they are placed and after each adjustment. These adjustments will make you more conscious of your teeth, but they should not be painful. This annoyance can be relieved with an over-the-counter pain reliever (use as directed). Today’s braces are smaller, more comfortable and use technology that reduces the discomfort. We use the latest in technology in order to reduce discomfort and treatment time.
Phase I, or Interceptive Treatment, is aimed intercepting a moderate or severe orthodontic problem early in order to reduce or eliminate it. Phase II begins when all the permanent teeth are erupted and usually lasts less than 18 months because of the major improvements accomplished during Phase I. See our page on ‘Braces for Kids’ to learn more about this type of treatment. Phase I treatment takes advantage of the early growth spurt and turns a difficult orthodontic problem into a more manageable one. This can often reduce the need for extractions or jaw surgery and allows us to deliver better long-term results and treatment options. This phase of treatment usually begins while the permanent front teeth are erupting (typically around the age of 8-9). Most Phase I patients will require a Phase II treatment in order to achieve an ideal bite.

If "Phase 1" treatment is recommended, can I just wait until my child is older?
This is not recommended. If your child needs Phase I treatment this usually means that he has a difficult problem that requires attention now. If no orthodontic action is taken, treatment options become limited, more difficult, and the long-term stability may be compromised. In addition, it may lead to extractions, jaw surgery and increased costs.
Absolutely not! Only certain orthodontic problems require early intervention. In fact, most of our patients are able to wait until most if not all their permanent teeth erupt to begin their orthodontic treatment.
This is not recommended. If your child needs Phase I treatment this usually means that he has a difficult problem that requires attention now. If no orthodontic action is taken, treatment options become limited, more difficult, and the long-term stability may be compromised. In addition, it may lead to extractions, jaw surgery and increased costs.
It is usually difficult for you to determine if treatment is necessary because there are many problems that can occur even though the front teeth look straight. Also, there are some problems that look intimidating and complex which will resolve on their own. Asking your general dentist is good reference, but we are your best resource since orthodontics is all we do. Our initial exam is complimentary and we would be more than happy to see your child and make any recommendations necessary.
The cost of orthodontic treatment will depend on many factors, including the severity of the problem, its complexity and length of treatment. Our financial coordinator will be glad to discuss the cost of treatment and your financing options with you before treatment begins. Patients are finding that braces are more affordable today than ever.
Crooked and crowded teeth are hard to clean and maintain. A bad bite can also cause abnormal wear of tooth surfaces, difficulty in chewing and/or speaking, and excess stress on supporting bone and gum tissue. Without treatment, many problems become worse and can require additional dental care later in life.
If you notice an unwanted change in your smile or bite, contact us at 703-451-4666 for information. An orthodontic “tune up” may be necessary to regain proper alignment.
Dr. Hudson will recommend how long to continue wearing your retainers, whether they are removable (the kind you put in and take out) or fixed (bonded behind your teeth). Wearing your retainers as prescribed is the best way to keep your teeth from moving after your orthodontic treatment. There are many reasons teeth may move following orthodontic treatment. Teeth are not set in concrete, they are set in bone. The bone around your teeth is continually changing (breaking down and rebuilding), and this could mean your teeth will shift after your braces are removed. By wearing your retainers, your teeth are more likely to remain where Dr. Hudson has placed them.
TPlaying an instrument or a contact sport may require some adjustment when you first get your braces, but wearing braces will not stop you from participating in any of your school activities. If you play a contact sport, it is recommended that you wear a mouth guard to protect your braces or appliance.
If your braces are causing discomfort or if something breaks, you should call our office. In most cases, we can address these issues over the telephone. If you require a repair or comfort appointment, we have time set aside in the schedule for you.
Yes! Regular checkups with your family dentist are important while in braces. Your family dentist will determine the intervals between cleaning appointments while you are in braces.
ALWAYS remember to brush your teeth after every meal and floss at least once a day. During your treatment, try to avoid foods with a lot of sugar (sugar increases the amount of bacteria that grows in your mouth, causing more plaque and possibly cavities). Make sure to use toothpaste that contains fluoride, and ask your orthodontist or family dentist if you need a fluoride rinse. This will help prevent cavities!
If you take out your retainer to eat, make sure you brush your teeth, floss, and remember to keep it safe in its container so that it does not get lost or broken. Keep your retainer clean by brushing it gently with a toothbrush and antibacterial soap. Do not put your retainer in boiling water or in the dishwasher. Brushing your retainer with toothpaste is not recommended.

@SMILESBYHUDSON

Schedule an appointment today!

We'd love to meet you! Click below to get in touch and schedule a visit.

Schedule a free consultation